free for the taking, free for the giving

There was once a farmer who had a bumper crop of sweet corn.  He decided to go to the nearest crossroads and sell them a dozen ears of corn per bag.  After he loaded up twenty bags, he drove to the crossroads, set up the bags on the tailgate of his truck and waited for customers.  One hour became two, two became three, and not one person came to buy the corn. Not a dozen, not an ear.  He saw car after car, but not one stopped.

So he loaded the corn back up, drove the truck back home, put away all twenty bags in the cellar refrigerator and decided to try again the next day.  So back up the cellar stairs he carried each bag, loading them into the truck, back to the crossroads.  This time, he set up in the late afternoon, thinking people might be more willing to buy corn on the way home for supper that night.  One hour became two, two became three, and not one person came to buy the corn.  Not a dozen, not an ear.

So he loaded the corn again, drove back home, putting all the bags back into the cellar refrigerator, to try again the next day.

The third day he changed locations, thinking maybe this would change his luck.  One hour became two, two became three, and not one person came to buy the corn. Not a dozen, not an ear. A third time, he loaded the corn, drove back home, putting all the bags back into the cellar refrigerator.

He felt discouraged.  He couldn’t sell the corn.  He was only one person, he couldn’t eat all of the corn.  What would he do with it?

The he heard of a gathering friends were having soon.  He called the hosts and offered them the corn, for free, just because he wanted to share what he had. It didn’t cost him any more than the corn he had already harvested and eaten.  It was extra, it was a bonus.  To the host, it was a blessing.

This farmer realized, it filled his heart more to give away the surplus, the extra, than it would ever fill his wallet.  So, he changed his tactics.  He no longer sells his corn. Now, to whomever he meets, he offers the bounty of his garden.  A tomato or two, a five-gallon bucket of cucumbers, bags of spinach and romaine lettuce.  Whatever he has, he offers. Which blesses both the giver and the receiver.

Isn’t that just like Grace? Grace is offered- for free- no fees, no charges, the payment was “Paid in Full” on the Cross and we get to benefit from blessings and bounty of Heaven.

Our Heavenly Farmer is offering abundant life, eternal life, everlasting joy, never-ending love, and mercies upon mercies to us all.  We just have to choose to receive the gift.

Have you chosen to receive the bountiful life?  Have you shared this bountiful life with others who are hungry?

It is free for the taking, it is free for the giving.  So give. Share. Bless others with the bounty of Heaven, just like someone else blessed you.

Advertisements

About gretchenr17

Wife, mother, daughter, sister, friend. Writer, farmer, fellow sojourner... at every turn I learn a bit more about God's wild mercies.
This entry was posted in reflections, Walking by Faith and not by sight and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s